SFTE 51st International Symposium  

Webinar

21-22

FREE to SFTE Members

$55 for Non-Members (SFTE Membership included)

Registration < Click Here

Notes:

Your Zoom links will be in the reply message after you register. There is a separate one for each day.

Please do not share or forward the link. In order to operate our webinar, each participant must register.

Wednesday October 21, 2020 

HH-60W Combat Rescue Helicopter Flight Test Update and Lessons from an Integrated Test Team

0700 PDT

10.21.20

HH-60W Combat Rescue Helicopter Flight Test Update & Lessons From an Integrated Test Team   

Dr. Jeff NewcampMMaj. Andrew Fama

USAF

Emerald Coast Chapter

The HH-60W Combat Rescue Helicopter’s developmental test campaign began at Sikorsky’s Development Flight Center in Jupiter, Florida in summer 2019. Combining efforts with the 413th Flight Test Squadron, this Integrated Test Team achieved remarkable flight and ground test progress in the first year. This presentation describes the first twelve months of testing from acceptance test procedures through envelope expansion and into weapons testing. The authors discuss hover performance, handling qualities and systems testing. The talk focuses on the technical aspects of the test planning and execution then addresses best practices for working in an Integrated Test Team.


Using a 1949 Piston-Powered Airplane to Train 21st Century Flight Testers


0730 PDT

10.21.20

Using a 1949 Piston-Powered Airplane to Train 21st Century Flight Testers

Russ ErbSM

USAF TPS

Antelope Valley Chapter

To evaluate "highly-adaptive, critical thinking flight test professionals", the USAF Test Pilot School sought out an affordable aircraft with a large flight deck to replace the unavailable C-130.  The Grumman HU-16 Albatross was found to be suitable for the task.  Being unfamiliar to all students allows direct evaluation of the student's adaptability.    Because "Nothing (good) happens fast in an Albatross", its limited performance forces the students to use more finesse to accomplish the test mission.  The very lack of modern technology allows the school to evaluate the student's grasp of the fundamentals of flight test without the augmentation of modern technology.  As a flying boat, the Albatross allows the additional benefit of teaching completely new skills (water operations) during qualitative evaluations.  Other organizations have also adopted the HU-16 into their curricula, including the US Naval TPS and International TPS, with the resulting invigoration of the Albatross owner community.

Garmin Autoland: Simulator and Flight Testing of an Emergency Autonomous Landing System

0800 PDT

10.21.20

Garmin Autoland: Simulator and Flight Testing of an Emergency Autonomous Landing System
Dr. Tiziano BernardM
, William A. Tuccio, Grant Wittenborn, Bailey Scheel, Eric Sargent, Jason Hewes, Wayne Litherland
Garmin International 

Wichita Chapter

Garmin® Emergency Autoland is an automated, safety-enhancing tool designed to take complete control of an aircraft in an emergency situation where the pilot is unable to fly. Emergency Autoland transforms the aircraft into an autonomous vehicle capable of selecting the optimal landing site based on multiple factors, including range, runway length, and ambient weather conditions. The system itself is autonomous: it is capable of not only being activated by someone on board, but it can also prompt the pilot/passengers for basic interactions to identify their status. If no interaction is detected by the pilot/passengers, it will initiate the landing procedure automatically. The nature of Emergency Autoland, being autonomous, and possibly activated by passengers, required extensive testing on two particular fronts: human factors (HF) testing, and in-flight testing. These two fronts fall within the themes of non-expert user interactions and autonomous system flight testing.

These are of particular interest in the coming autonomous flying vehicle era including unmanned vehicles, air-taxis, commercial space tourism, and complex national airspace system operations in general. The paper will introduce Emergency Autoland and its conception and focus primarily on simulator testing efforts for HF/usability and the progressive flight test campaign. The paper shall describe the lessons learned from designing a system destined to be operated by non-expert users (i.e. non-pilot passengers). This includes factors of interest such as automation in the cockpit, passenger experience during an inflight emergency, and the related operations within the national airspace system (NAS).

Finally, the paper shall describe the lessons learned from the flight test campaign, including the various phases and recommended practices.


Thursday October 22, 2020 

Validation of Workload Buildup Flight Test Technique Using Ocular Parameters

0700 PDT

10.22.20

Validation of Workload Buildup Flight Test Technique Using Ocular Parameters

Dilli Babu Mohan M
Aircraft Systems Testing Establishment

India Chapter

Workload Buildup technique is based on Boundary Avoidance Tracking (BAT) theory which hypothesis that pilot cognitive load or pilot gain increases in conditions wherein pilot is imposed with physical or subconscious boundary limits. The HQ of the aircraft in a given environment greatly influences the cognitive load of the pilot. Ocular parameters have been reported to have strong correlation with the cognitive load/state. The objective was to investigate BAT Theory using a COTS eye gaze tracker to record ocular parameters like fixations and saccades to study the effects on the cognitive load of the pilot. The statistical model involved three independent variables, namely aircraft flying qualities, secondary task, and Boundary limits. The experiments were conducted in two stages on a fixed base variable stability HQ research flight simulator. The study was extended to inflight tests involving three flights in BAES Hawk and Jaguar aircraft undertaking Air to Ground Attack Tasks. Both studies found a significant correlation between Boundary size and ocular parameters, in particular, the rate of fixations. The results proved the application and effectiveness of Workload Buildup technique to elevate pilot gain in HQ Stress Testing of new aircraft.

 

How to Train your Space Tester: Challenges of Traditional Test Techniques on Space Vehicles 

07300 PDT

10.22.20

How to Train your Space Tester: Challenges of Traditional Test Techniques on Space Vehicles 

Michael NayakM , Evelyn Kent, Christina Straight

USAF
New Mexico Chapter

The forthcoming Space Test Pilot School, to imbue space professionals with test fundamentals, can have far reaching consequences for both the burgeoning US Space Force, as well as the venerable air-breathing Test Pilot School (TPS) institution. This paper presents a synopsis of criteria for applying traditional air-breather test techniques to space tests. We also discuss three challenges we anticipate in applying traditional TPS-taught test techniques to space operations and test: 

(1) Sunk-cost testing: Once a satellite is launched, an expanded system of low-risk testing can be undertaken using targets of opportunity and “dead time” as spacecraft orbit the Earth. Satellite end-of-life (EOL) test design, in particular, is discussed. This framework significantly changes the design of tests and the application of pre-test modeling.

(2) Testing currency: The qualifications and recency of a tester at the “controls” must be considered in the context of a single misstep potentially resulting in the entire asset being lost. We suggest that hours in high-risk test per spacecraft may become the defining factor for space test execution.

(3) Role of the Principal Investigator (PI): A new concept to the air world, the role of the PI is similar to that of a test designer. In the space world, however, there is generally a gap between the PI’s knowledge and that of a test conductor. Addressing this gap is key to ensuring successful tests, and is a role that should be explored by Space Test Pilot School.

Changing Climates: Balancing Mother Nature and DoD Acquisitions

0800 PDT

10.22.20

Changing Climates: Balancing Mother Nature and DoD Acquisitions              

Joseph BrownM
USAF

Emerald Coast Chapter

Environmental changes are a constant in both nature and defense acquisitions. Mother Earth forces us to deal with changing climates and natural disasters while defense acquisitions push for rapid development and a lean workforce. During the fall of 2018 through 2019, our AIM-9X test team was tested on both environmental fronts. Hurricane Michael struck Tyndall AFB, disabling their aerial target support for months, and a magnitude 7.1 earthquake damaged China Lake’s test range and capabilities - all the while, AIM-9X was preparing to field it’s latest software series and conducting extensive developmental test. Without preparation, teamwork, and grit, this program could have slipped by months or years. However, our multi-agency test team rose to the challenge, downing the first two QF-16s at WSMR and conducting 7 live fires in 7 days at Eglin AFB. This paper will examine the key strategies employed by the test team in terms of team organization, communication, and mission execution that led to these successes.

 

2020 SFTE Live Awards Ceremony 


0830 PDT

10.22.20

2020 SFTE Awards Ceremony LIVE

The SFTE Board of Directors has selected the James S. McDonnell and Kelly Johnson award winners but the results have been kept TOP SECRET to be announced LIVE at this time. All award nominees will be highlighted for their achievements and are invited to attend.

 

Introduction of 2020 Fellows
The highest grade achievable in SFTE is Fellow. A Senior Member in good standing for at least two years who has attained a position of notable distinction in the field of flight testing was nominated by a member or Chapter and selected by their peers (those Fellows in good standing). They are awarded with an automatic lifetime membership in the Society along with the distinction and responsibility associated with this honor.


SFTE James S. McDonnell Award
Team Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Flight Test Engineering

CH-53K Integrated Test Team

.  

413th Flight Test Squadron 

F/A-18 Ski Jump Team  

.  

USAF F-15SA (Saudi Advanced) System Program Office (SPO) and F-15SA Combined Test Team (CTT)  

.  

SFTE Kelly Johnson Award
Individual Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Flight Test Engineering

Gene Kranz

Nasa 

Kristen Finnegan

US Navy, Pax River